Your improvement is your responsibility

Karate at dawn

I really liked the introduction from the book Exercises for Programmers, by Brian P. Hogan:

Practice makes permanent.

A concert pianist practices many hours a day, learning music, practicing drills, and honing her skills. She practices the same piece of music over and over, learning every little detail to get it just right. Because when she performs, she wants to deliver a performance she is proud of for the people who spent their time and money to hear it.

A pro football player spends hours in the gym lifting, running, jumping, and doing drills over and over until he masters them. And then he practices the sport. He’ll study plays and watch old game videos. And, of course, he’ll play scrimmage and exhibition games to make sure he’s ready to perform during the real contest.

A practitioner of karate spends a lifetime doing kata, a series of movements that imitate a fight or battle sequence, learning how to breathe and flex the right muscles at the right time. She may do the same series of movements thousands of times, getting better and better with each repetition.

The best software developers I’ve ever met approach their craft the same way. They don’t go to work every day and practice on the employer’s dime. They invest personal time in learning new languages and perfecting techniques in others. Of course, they learn new things on the job, but because they’re getting paid, there’s an expectation that they are there to perform, not practice.

Brian P. Hogan

Pay me and teach me

Too often software developers complains that their employer should be held responsible for their formation. 

That’s so far from the truth! Your employer is paying you to perform, not to learn.

Of course, a learning-friendly environment is something desirable, but that not a strict requirement to continue learning and improve on your craft.

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